Eileen Myles at the Awl on the VIDA Stats

The chart from VIDA on the rate at which women are reviewed and published versus men is an eye-opener. Eileen Myles’ reaction is one of the most personally felt and vigorous to date. Honestly, I could quote the whole thing, but, here’s the opener:

When I think about being female I think about being loved. What I mean by that: I have a little exercise I do when I present my work or speak publicly or even write (like this). In order to build up my courage I try to imagine myself deeply loved. Because there are men whose lives I’ve avidly followed—out of admiration for their work or their “way.” Paolo Pasolini always comes to mind. I love his work, his films, his poetry, his writings on film and literature, his life, all of it, even his death. How did he do it—make such amazing work and stand up so boldly as a queer and a Marxist in a Catholic country in the face of so much (as his violent death proved) hate. I have one clear answer. He was loved. Pasolini’s mother was wild about him. We joke about this syndrome—Oh she was an Italian mother, but she could just have well been a Jewish mother, an Irish mother, an African-American one. A mother loves her son. And so does a country. And that is much to count on. So I try to conjure that for myself particularly when I’m writing or saying something that seems both vulnerable and important so I don’t have to be defending myself so hard. I try and act like its mine. The culture. That I’m its beloved son. It’s not an impossible conceit. But it’s hard. Because a woman, reflexively, often feels unloved. When I saw the recent Vida pie charts that showed how low the numbers are of female writers getting reviewed in the mainstream press I just wasn’t surprised at all though I did cringe. When you see your oldest fears reflected back at you in the hard bright light of day it doesn’t feel good. Because a woman is someone who grew up observing that a whole lot more was being imagined by everyone for her brother and the boys around her in school. If she’s a talented artist she’s told that she could probably teach art to children when she grows up and then she hears the boy who’s good in art get told by the same teacher that one day he could grow up to be a commercial artist. The adult doing the talking in these kinds of exchanges is most often female. And the woman who is still a child begins to wonder if her childhood is already gone because she has been already replaced in the future by a woman who will be teaching children like herself.

Read the rest here.

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2 comments

  1. Chris

    “But I want to be loved because I am.”
    Damn powerful piece. I WAS surprised by the pie chart when I went to the VIDA sponsored panel at AWP (ironically enough Randall Mann introducing/moderating was the initial factor that made me notice and consider the event). Then I remembered the NYTBR greatest American Works of last 25 years: Toni Morrison and four white men (whose singularly talent is each person’s own opinion). I received an education and an intent to examine closer by the end. Like Bad Brains said, it’s I against I. In life or lit life.

  2. Pingback: The Education of Women Writers |

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